“In fact, it is a myth even that President Trump is inarticulate.”

If you mean a president at the end of a three-day meth binge—then, yes
In fact, it is a myth even that President Trump is inarticulate. His speech is actually more adroit, fluent, and grammatical than were many of the extempore remarks and answers to press questions of Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Johnson, Ford, Carter, and both Bushes. He is slightly less articulate than Presidents Clinton and Obama, who never said anything memorable but made their points smoothly. Mr. Trump is not as thoughtful a speaker or public conversationalist as John F. Kennedy or Richard Nixon, and not a great orator like Franklin D. Roosevelt or Ronald Reagan. But he handles press questions better than Reagan did, and delivers extempore addresses better and more animatedly and effectively than Mr. Obama did…. The emerging fact, which will take a long time to be admitted because it is so unpalatable, is that he looks, and largely sounds, like a president.
—Conrad, Lord Tubby, National Review, Feb. 14, 2018.

“Look, having nuclear—my uncle was a great professor and scientist and engineer, Dr. John Trump at MIT; good genes, very good genes, OK, very smart, the Wharton School of       Finance, very good, very smart—you know, if you’re a conservative Republican, if I were a liberal, if, like, OK, if I ran as a liberal Democrat, they would say I’m one of the          smartest people anywhere in the world— it’s true!—but when you’re a conservative Republican they try—oh, do they do a number—that’s why I always start off: Went to          Wharton, was a good student, went there, went there, did this, built a fortune—you know I have to give my like credentials all the time, because we’re a little disadvantaged—but you   look at the nuclear deal, the thing that really bothers me—it would have been so easy, and it’s not as important as these lives are—nuclear is powerful; my uncle explained that to me   many, many years ago, the power and that was 35 years ago; he would explain the power of what’s going to happen and he was right, who would have thought?—but when you look at what’s going on with the four prisoners—now it used to be three, now it’s four—but when it was three and even now, I would have said it’s all in the messenger; fellas, and it is          fellas because, you know, they don’t, they haven’t figured that the women are smarter right now than the men, so, you know, it’s gonna take them about another 150 years—but the Persians are great negotiators, the Iranians are great negotiators, so, and they, they just killed, they just killed us.”
—Donald Trump, from his July 19, 2016, campaign speech in Sun City, S.C.

“Grist” being a euphemism for thinly veiled racist bullshit
[T]he United States has threatened to “tear up” NAFTA, in which Mexico has a $70-billion trade surplus with the U.S., while also making it clear that it would no longer continue to accept practically unlimited numbers of illegal immigrants, almost all of them unskilled and not fluent in English, who have come from, or at least through, Mexico by the millions and for decades. Trump has also famously claimed that an inordinate number of these undocumented entrants are criminals, including many violent criminals. The frequency of incidents involving such people in rape and murder cases is a continuing source of grist for Trump’s political mil—Conrad, Lord Tubby, National Post, Feb. 16, 2018.

Mexico’s trade surplus with the U.S. is a red herring. Its large trade deficit with the rest of the world reduces global  imbalances and so helps moderate the U.S. deficit. While the    global trading system clearly needs fixing, punishing Mexican exporters would do little to address the fundamental problem of excess savings in certain countries. Worst of all, it would only make U.S. trade even more unbalanced.
—Michael Pettis, bloomberg.com, Feb. 8, 2017.

Were a President Trump to deport all illegal immigrants, the economy would suffer greatly. Just ask Arizona, where a   crackdown on illegal immigrants in 2007 shrank the     economy by 2%, according to a private analysis by Moody’s, a ratings agency, for the Wall Street Journal. The incomes of most workers would fall.
—The Economist, Aug, 25, 2018.

[S]everal studies, over many years, have concluded that immigrants are less likely to commit crimes than people born in the United States. And experts say the available evidence does not support the idea that undocumented immigrants commit a disproportionate share of crime. “There’s no way I can mess with the numbers to get a different conclusion,” said Alex Nowrasteh, immigration policy analyst at the          libertarian Cato Institute….
—New York Times, Jan. 26, 2017.

Or, better still, booting him in the goolies as if he were Trump himself scamming the suckers who enrolled in his “university” out of their life savings
Canadians have been led into contempt for Trump as if by a particularly duplicitous Judas goat by their hopeless, Kool-Aid-sodden media that just parrots the feed from the American media Trump won the election attacking, and which he has outflanked through social media and his domination of the talk-show world. Some Canadians might be impressed by Justin politically punching Trump in the face as if he were Patrick Brazeau.
—Conrad, Lord Tubby, op. cit.

Somebody could use a new abacus for his birthday
The U.S. economy is growing at more than twice the rate of Canada’s….
—Conrad, Lord Tubby, National Post, Feb. 16, 2018.

The United States is projected to grow 2.7 percent in 2018 as President Trump’s tax cuts boost growth, the International Monetary Fund said in a new report Monday, delivering    more positive economic news as the president passes his one-year mark in the White House. But deep inequality remains in the country and the IMF does not expect the growth to last long.
—Heather Long, Washington Post, Jan. 22, 2018.

IMF hikes forecast for Canadian economic growth: Canada’s economy is expected to grow by 2.3 per cent in 2018…according to the IMF
—Financial Post, Jan. 22, 2018.

Another loud thud, this time at Black Manor
Judge St. Eve stared at Black with the bemused gaze of a shepherd watching a couple of his sheep mating in the field. [She then] sentenced Conrad Black to forty-two months,                     representing an additional thirteen months in prison. As soon as the sentence was announced, Barbara Amiel dropped with a loud thud as if she had been shot with a Taser.
—Steven Skurka, Titled: The Trials of Conrad Black (2008).

Today President Donald J. Trump announced his intent to nominate an eleventh wave of judicial nominees as follows… Amy J. St. Eve of Illinois will serve as a Circuit Judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.
—whitehouse.com, Feb. 12, 2018.

Oh, stop, you had us at contextomy!
@ConradMBlack 2018-02-19
This sets a particularly low bar for contextomy, even by the dismal standards of the left-leaning Canadian press. The quote relates exclusively to the net effect of the tax bill, the “gotcha” tweet refers to a multivariate forecast hinging primarily on monetary policy. twitter.com/InklessPW/stat…

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2 comments on ““In fact, it is a myth even that President Trump is inarticulate.”
  1. OJM says:

    “The quote relates exclusively to the net effect of the tax bill, the ‘gotcha’ tweet refers to a multivariate forecast hinging primarily on monetary policy.”

    Black is correct to the extent that Goldman-Sachs’ predictions with regard to long-term US federal debt trends do depend critically on an assumption of rising interest rates. But he has no reason to chortle, since G-S’s analysis also says the Trump tax cuts will have only a modest and short-lived effect on GDP growth, far less than what would be required for the cuts to be self-financing.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/02/19/goldman-sachs-warns-us-spending-could-push-up-rates-and-debt-levels.html

  2. daveS says:

    Abacus (addition and subtraction) or the counting beads in a playpen.
    Slide rule is more like it (for multiplication, exponentiation, division).
    [ from the antipodes, a java based one for your edificaiton:
    http://www.hercsmusicsystems.com.au/react/k_e_decilon.html ]

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